Welcome to Crevice Reamer's Website
SMALL LATHES 
GRIZZLY G0602 10x22
Part one, Uncrating:
http://crevicereamer.com/Page_86.html

Part two
TEARDOWN GUIDE:

G0602 Manual:
http://cdn4.grizzly.com/manuals/g0602_m.pdf
Parts list:
http://cdn4.grizzly.com/partslists/g0602_pl.pdf

On this page, I'm going to take as much weight off the lathe as possible, for those who have to move it
with little help or truck transport. This also helps with clean up. It's amazing how much gunk is UNDER
the parts. For example, the chuck is hard to remove now because the red gunk is on the threads--Imagine
if you didn't remove the chuck for a couple of years--It might NEVER come off.
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With all of the extra parts plus crate top and sides removed, it now weighs only 373 pounds.

Before you start, Now is a good time to check the Gearcase oil level. The sight glass for this is at the
bottom center front of the headstock:
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This little door rotates open to let stock go through the spindle and extend out without opening the entire
headstock door.
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Removing this screw allows the headstock access door to swing open:
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If you look under the lower right gear, you can just see the edge of the gearcase oil drain plug:
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Let's start the teardown. This screw limits the tailstock movement. Since we want to remove the tailstock,
let's turn it down as far as it will go:
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Now loosen the tailstock nut, and slide it right off the end of the bed. This weighs 22 LBS.Photobucket 

Remove the nut that holds the steady rest, and lift off the  5 pound rest:
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Remove the two Allen head screws that fasten the 2 pound follow rest, and set that aside:
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I know we're removing stuff, but now you have to INSTALL the hand-wheel handles. They are the
same size, so it doesn't matter which one goes where:
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The X axis and compound dials are graduated .001.
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But there are NO reference dials on the carriage hand wheel:
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Crank the cross slide away from you as far as it will go. When it stops moving, grab it and
pull it off the ways. Be careful not to drop the gib. This weighs 21 pounds with tool post attached.
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Here's the underside, with gib to left:
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And some pics of the channel the X screw rides in. The screw is 17 TPI, about a half inch thick,
and it is 12 1/4" long, from tip to end at hand-wheel.
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That channel is 1 1/8" wide and 1" deep.
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Remove the nut from the end of the 3/4" x 33 1/4" twelve TPI, Z screw:
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Then the two Allen socket screws, and remove the bearing block: All of this weighs about 1 pound.
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Leave the screws out for now:
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At the other end is a brass shear pin. LEAVE THAT ALONE. If you want to remove the lead screw,
drive out that roll pin on left with a 1/8" pin punch.
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Shift the halfnut lever and crank the carriage/apron as far towards the end of bed as it will go:
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And then pull it the rest of the way off. The carriage/apron weighs 25 pounds:
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Here's the underside of the apron:
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And the carriage:
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This lathe is definitely NOT a Sieg. Look at the hand scraping on this carriage way.
DO NOT SMOOTH THIS AWAY, IT IS FOR PRECISION FIT AND OIL RETENTION!
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The underside of the tailstock is also scraped:
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This kind of quality workmanship is not usually seen on a Chinese machine.

After putting a block or something under to support it, remove the tailstock-end backsplash screw first.
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Then the lower headstock-end screw:
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And finally, while supporting the 8 pound backsplash, remove the top screw:
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I didn't take this picture, but stole it from another post. Since I'm not taking the gearcase apart, I
just wanted you to see what's in there. If You DO take this apart, drain the oil first.
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Okay! We've removed 83 pounds of relatively easy machine weight. Now it might get harder. The
Manual says remove these two Chuck screws and then, using the chuck keys, unscrew the chuck.
It's NOT a left-hand thread, so it screws off counterclockwise as normal screws do--just like a light bulb--BUT, it is likely
glued on with chinese red gunk in the threads. So maybe the chuck will come right off--Or maybe you
will end up exerting so much force that the chuck key bends and the spindle holes get made into an
oval shape instead of round.
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MIne would NOT come right off, and MY spindle now has oval shaped holes. If YOUR
chuck won't come off with reasonable force, forget using the chuck keys for now--They will probably
work later after you clean & oil the spindle threads, but NOW, you need an industrial strength solution.

Close the chuck jaws tightly and fit a large adjustable wrench to the jaws:
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Then wrap a large pipe wrench around the spanner nuts. DO NOT use a pipe wrench on the CHUCK!
These 2 spanner nuts cost $6 each. Not so bad if you ruin THEM. Keep the pipe wrench from hitting
anything in there.
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Anyway, pull the two wrenches together and Shazam! The chuck will break loose. It turns VERY easily
once loose, so be carefull not to pinch fingers or something when it moves so fast.

Notice the board protecting the ways--in case the 14 pound chuck should fall onto them:
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There you see it: Red gunk in the threads. Holds like Super Glue. Be sure to clean and oil well before
reassembling the chuck. Note the oval holes in the spindle:
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The chuck threads are also very rough inside:
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The spanner nuts now have a few teeth marks, but are otherwise unharmed:
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Here's where we are so far: There is not much more that is easy to remove. This all now weighs 275 pounds.
The wooden pallet weighs about 12 pounds. If you lift with a sling, don't wrap it around the lead screw. You can
see the motor on the right:
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The motor looks like cast iron, but it's actually cast aluminum. It probably weighs about 30 pounds. I'm not removing mine, but YOU
might need to, so let's look at what's involved:
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This  lower motor mount screw, which is tapped directly into the bed,  looks like it has some weldment
hindering the bolt from being removed. Don't the Chinese have lock washers? This will  probably have
to be chiseled off.
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The other-end  bolts are accessible from the belt case:
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It looks like the belt just slips off when you remove the motor bolts and lift up the motor:
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This panel will only fit when the lightning bolt is aiming down:
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I suppose you COULD disconnect the motor from here, but it does not look inviting, The little box is the
motor contactor, which is just a high current relay. SOP on Chinese machinery is to tug test all wiring
for loose terminals:
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This is no MORE inviting, but at least looks possible. These pictures should help you wire it back up:
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SOP on Chinese machinery is to tug test all wiring for loose terminals:
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That rubber gasket makes it really tough to line up the screws when replacing the cover.
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Here's the front panel:
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And what's behind it:
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SOP on Chinese machinery is to tug test all wiring for loose terminals:
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I know you may want to remove the heavy headstock--DON'T DO IT! The headstock may have been shimmed for
accuracy at the factory. You might lose that accuracy if you remove it. Same probably goes for spindle
bearings. Do not remove unless ABSOLUTELY necessary.

Here are some more size comparisons: A 7x14 matched to the end of the 10x22 bed:
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A mini-lathe chuck on the 5 inch chuck:
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And the same 3 inch chuck IN the jaws of a 6 1/2 inch chuck:
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Can you tell which one of these toolposts came from the G0602?
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WORK STAND INFORMATION:

The spindle centerline is 13 inches from the bottom of the bed. There are two
mounting holes in the bottom of the mill. This one is under the tailstock:
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And this one under the headstock:
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The holes run through the chip pan and are 32.5 inches center to center. The chip pan is 47.75 x 13 inches. The Headstock
hole is 9.25 inches in from the left. The tailstock hole is 5.75 inches from the right.
The holes are equidistant from each side, and will allow 1/2 inch bolts through them. The mounting centerline follows the center of the bed. The SPINDLE centerline is offset slightly to the rear. 

You should plan on mounting the lathe centerline at least 17 inches from any wall in back, and the area to left must be clear to 24 inches from headstock mounting hole to allow room for the belt access door to swing open:

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WAY SMOOTHING:

Do NOT do any way smoothing on this lathe. The ways are plenty smooth already.

For cleanup instructions, go to:

http://crevicereamer.com/Page_9.html

CR.

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