Welcome to Crevice Reamer's Website
G0602 10x22 SMALL LATHE
FACTS & MODS
ADJUSTABLE TURNING STOP:

Wouldn't it be nice to not worry about running the cutting tool into the chuck? Or wouldn't it be great to be able to return to a specific spot--say for parting off?

Here's the way I added that capability:

Materials needed:

1) 1/2 x 7 1/2 inch carriage bolt
1) 1/2x 13 nut
1) 7/16 washer. (Smaller hole size fits bolt more tightly)
1) 1/2-13 tap

First, measure 1 1/16 inches to left of prismatic way, then measure 9/16 inch up from top of transmission.
Punch and center drill:
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Starting small and working up through a series of drills, keep increasing hole size until Tap Drill size is
reached. The headstock cast iron is very hard and not easy to drill into. Make a great effort
to keep drills straight:
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Normal drill size for 1/2-13 is 27/64. Because the material is so hard, and threads are not load-bearing,
I used a 7/16 for easier tapping. Hole has reached tap size:
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No room for normal tap handles. During this step it is EXTREMELY important to keep tap straight.
Check alignment with bed after every 1/4 turn. If tap IS crooked, back up and lightly hammer the tap
straight. Do NOT force the tap:
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Those are 1/2-13 threads. Sorry for the bad picture.
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Turning stop in use. Wind CB out to proper position and secure jam nut:
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Carriage will now stop every time at exact set position. CAUTION,  this stop is NOT for threading or
power feed use, or CNC operation:
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There's still plenty of adjustment left inside the head stock:
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When It's not needed, just wind it all the way in and secure jam nut  to keep it out of the way:
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QUICK AND CHEAP CAMLOCK FOR TAILSTOCK:

Sure, you can make this yourself, but in case you have more important things to do:

First, buy this $20 kit from LMS:
http://littlemachineshop.com/products/product_view.php?ProductID=3430&category=

It is made for a C6, so will need slight mods to fit 10x22:

1. Go to lowe's or Home Depot and buy a 4 1/2 inch long 1/2-13 bolt and a 1/2-13 Jam Nut--Less than
$2. Jam nuts are very thin nuts:
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2. Relieve tailstock slightly to allow camlock to fit. I used a dremel with cutting disk here. WEAR A MASK!
CAST IRON DUST IS TOXIC!
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3. Prime and Use any beige paint to touch up. Put it all together and Voila! Fast tailstock moves:
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ADDING A CHUCK TO YOUR TAIL STOCK:


Here's my new drill chuck arbor. It has a short JT-33 taper on one end, and a long MT3 taper, with tang,
on the other. Most MT3 arbors are too long and come with either a tang end or threaded drawbar end:
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It will FIT, but the downside is that more than an inch of barrel movement is lost. That is, you must
crank the tailstock barrel way out before it will grab the arbor, and that leaves a shortage of drill depth
to work with:
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The solution is to cut the Arbor shorter. NOT the exact amount that the
barrel protrudes--Doing that will make it impossible to remove the arbor
by cranking it back. Rather, leave about 1/16 inch of the protrusion amount
on the arbor. Make a mark at that point and chuck the tang into the vise:
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Now, using a cutoff disk, (Here a 4 inch CO disk in an angle grinder) carefully cut the arbor shorter. Out
of a 1 1/4 inch protrusion I cut 1 3/16 inch off:
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These two pieces are the result. With a file, bevel the edges of that cut. Clean the arbor with alcohol:
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Now, the arbor is tight with just a fraction of the former barrel protrusion:
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I have 2 Sieg X2s and wanted to use one of their JT-33 chucks--but the chuck is already on an R8 arbor
This one has never been used and still has red grease on it:
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To remove a chuck from an arbor, first open the chuck jaws wide. Then set it in a vise and close the vise
jaws to loosely fit the arbor--Loosen them a bit farther. Next, insert a large pin punch down into contact
with the top of the arbor. Make arrangements to catch the arbor when it comes loose to avoid damage to
the R8 mating surface. Strike the pin punch with a hammer until the arbor slips free:
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That leaves an R8 arbor to put away for storage:
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Put the new arbor into the tail stock, fit the chuck onto it, place a board onto the front of the chuck and
give the board a few hammer whacks. That's it. Ready to drill:
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TORMACH DRILL CHUCK HOLDERS:

If you have Tormach drill chuck holders for your mill, the 3/4 inch arbor will fit into a 3/4 inch QC boring bar holder for
drilling from the tool post.
http://cnczone.com/forums/showthread...312&page=2.#20

SCROLLING FOUR JAW CHUCK:

Grizzly sells five inch 1 3/4-8 threaded backplates (#54-2)
http://www.grizzly.com/products/G0602/parts/7

This backplate fits the Grizzly five inch four jaw scroll chuck perfectly without any modifications:
http://www.grizzly.com/products/5-4-Jaw-Plain-Back-Scroll-Chuck/G9834

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This chuck can easily hold 2.5 inch square stock:
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Or you could just switch backplates back and forth between 3 jaw and 4 jaw. Loosen the adapter screws
before you remove the chuck:
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I have not tried the 6 1/2 inch chuck with another yet, but I would imagine that this backplate (Not listed for purchase) would also fit another six inch plain back chuck.

ANOTHER SOURCE for chuck adapters. Warehouse tool has chuck adapters for 10x22:
 
6 inch  1 3/4 - 8 threaded chuck adapter plate, $39 :
 
8 inch 1 3/4 - 8 threaded chuck adapter plate, $39:
 
The adapter comes with oversize register face. You mount the adapter on your lathe and then turn the register to fit your chuck. This also makes the chuck run true to YOUR spindle, so it's a good way to go.

CR.

5C COLLET CHUCK:

ORIGINALLY POSTED BY Hans_G;661002: "]The Yahoo Grizzly 10x22 group had a few people who bought the CDCO 5C collet chuck and a spare 3 jaw chuck backing plate from grizzly (p/n P0602054-2, P0602054 is the 3 jaw chuck itself). The holes in the plate line up with the chuck. But since you asked about a nose... Look in the photos, there's one guy who made his own nose and posted several pics."
 

TOUCH-UP PAINT:
Grizzly also sells paint:

PPAINT-14  BEIGE REF (G0555)


SPINDLE BEARINGS:

Timkin roller bearings $28 set:
#32009XM90KM1

GEARBOX OIL FILLER:

This is a 3/8" pipe thread. Just install a 3/8" street ell. You remove plug, and screw this into hole. It acts as a funnel and makes adding oil much easier. After use, remove it and install original plug to maximize carriage travel. I cannot take credit for this idea. It comes from "Stephen" at
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/10x22grizzlyandthelike/messages/93?l=1
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See the two pins in the Z lead screw coupling? The one on the left is a removable roll pin. The shiny one
on the right is a SHEAR PIN. It is designed to break before anything valuable can be harmed. If this breaks,
(probably because you drove the carriage into the chuck face) you must replace it with something equally
soft. Grizzly sells the actual sheer pins (#815) for $1.50 each:

http://www.grizzly.com/products/G0602/parts/3

CR.

INCREASING SPINDLE BORE?

Originally Posted by kanton View Post
"How much could the G0602's 1.00" spindle bore be increased easily and cheaply and how would this be done?

Thanks."

You will have to decide what is safe:

The diameter at chuck end is 2.65 inches. Bore at large end of M4 taper is 1.205 inch, with wall thickness of 0.272 inch.

Diameter at bearing journals is 1.775 inches

Diameter at narrowest end is 1.575 inch, with a wall thickness of 0.262 inch.
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The bore at end of narrow/gears end is 1 052 inch,
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There is a keyway cut into that to a depth of 0.18 inch, leaving 0.082 inch underneath.
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The M4 taper ends with about a 1/16" lip. This is the narrowest point, about 1.05". This lip starts about 6 inches into the spindle and narrows the rest of the bore. You can see it from the chuck-end:
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I think you could safely bore it to about 1 1/8 inch. This would leave a floor of 0.041 inch (a little more than 1/32 inch) under that keyway. If you are truly adventurous, Bore another 1/32 inch to 1 3/16 inches--THAT would leave a very-tiny floor under slot of 0.00975 inches.

It's supposed to be a hardened spindle, so might have to be ground, not bored. However, the holes in the spindle nose are very easy to ovalize--so the whole thing may just be soft enough to bore it out with a long bar--Maybe a 12 incher.
CR.
 
CROSS SLIDE T SLOTS:
The G0602 used to come with 2 T slots in cross slide--in fact, the catalogue pics still show them. The newer models do not have this feature, and there are no T slot cross slides available from parts anymore.

OILING HEADSTOCK BEARINGS:
DO NOT oil your headstock bearings. They come packed in grease. Adding oil to the oiler ports only dilutes the grease. The oil will thin the grease too much, while simultaneously leaking out from around the unsealed bearings. Eventually, the bearings will run dry and fail.

The headstock may have been shimmed for accuracy at the factory. DO NOT REMOVE the headstock unless absolutely necessary. Same for spindle bearings.

The 2400 RPM speed is not useful for much and there are reasons not to use it:
1. The 1022 motor was designed originally for 230V 50 Hz electricity, and the motor may lack starting torque at the highest speed.
2. At this speed, grease will sling out of the unsealed spindle bearings.
 
MOTOR WIRING WRONG IN MANUAL?

ORIGINALLY POSTED BY Stuff-Builder: "I have an update on my flaming-G0602.
 
I called Grizzly and they're supposedly going to send me a new contactor.  They said it was out of stock and would take 7-10 days to turn around.
 
In the meantime, I was at a controls supplier we use for work, and rummaged around in his spares pile.  I found a Siemens 1 hp contactor with a 120 vac coil - price $0.00!
 
Long story short, I got the new contactor installed and everything works great.  Here are a few things I found out.
 
The wiring info in the manual is somewhat wrong.  It shows the Line wire running through the coil of the contactor and then out to the E-Stop, through the start switch and latch, and then back to N.  This is actually backwards from the way it's really done.
 
Also, my L and N wires were backwards coming from the wall to the contactor!  I found that out when I went to wire everything back together.  The photo shows a black N wire and a white L wire from the wall.  When you ring out the cord, this is not correct!  Mine was actually labeled correctly (black: L, white:N) but was not hooked up correctly.
 
There are two black wires just labeled L that come out of the casting.  You have to use an ohm-meter to determine which is going to the motor and which goes to the start switch.  In the manual photo one is red and the other black, on my lathe both were black.
 
Anyway, I hope this helps someone.  Beware I'm neither an electrician or an EE, just an ME who knows some about electrical and controls.  It's entirely possible I've made some mistake here.
 
Scott"


IS A FOUR WAY TOOL POST SAME AS QUICK CHANGE?

ORIGINALLY POSTED BY DaveDavies;389601 In answer to question: "The Grizzly specs say the G0602 comes with a "Four Way Tool Post".  Is that the same thing as a Quick Change Tool Post?"
 
"No, a Four Way Tool Post allows you to clamp four different lathe bits facing in four different directions. You unlock and rotate the TP to change tools.
 
A QCTP on the other hand holds a single tool in a holder. You can buy as many holders as you can, mount any manner of tool bits in them, then swap them out very quickly. In my opinion, a QCTP is the better way to go."
 

>>> "And speaking of accessories, what would you consider a reasonable set of tooling and accessories to get with this lathe?" 
 
"Everyone has their own favorites, but a good start might be: Knurling tool, parting tool, center drills, Jacobs' chuck with a #3 Morse Taper, #4MT to #3 MT adapter sleeve (so you can use your tailpiece attachments in the head), full set of lathe dogs (the G0602 comes with a faceplate), a real oilcan.
 
At least, those are what I added right away."
 
Dave"


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